Distribution, Competition, and Antitrust / IP Law

Archives for May 2014

Collusion Regarding Terms of Medical Resident Employment?

Did you ever wonder why teaching hospitals can conduct their medical residency “match” program?  And why they can share data and use it to help set wages for residents?  And why the match program effectively forbids salary negotiation?  The apparent result is that medical residents’ wages have remained flat for about 40 years.

Slate has the story — including the explanation for the above phenomenon, an antitrust exemption granted by Congress.  Discuss among yourselves the wisdom of that exemption.

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A Rare Challenge to a Class Action Settlement . . . From a Named Plaintiff

One of the named class plaintiffs in the high-tech employee antitrust case has filed an objection to the proposed class settlement.  The plaintiff, Mr. Michael Devine, analogized the approximately $300 million settlement (worth approximately 10% of alleged damages) to a “shoplifter . . . caught on video stealing a $400 iPad from the Apple Store” and a resulting settlement of $40, with the shoplifter keeping the iPad and making no admission of wrongdoing.

Objections by named plaintiffs are quite rare — though a single objection, even by a named plaintiff, is unlikely to carry the day.

The New York Times has the details here.

 

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Northern District of California Raises the Bar on Exclusive Dealing Claims

In PNY Technologies, Inc. v. SanDisk Corp., Case No. C-11-04689 (N.D. Cal. Apr. 25, 2014) (Orrick, J.), the court dismissed PNY’s exclusive dealing and attempted monopolization claims. I previously covered the case here.

The case is significant because it found – on a motion to dismiss – that allegations of foreclosure from a substantial percentage of retail outlets were insufficient as a matter of law. The court took judicial notice of SanDisk’s contracts with retailers under the “incorporation by reference” doctrine, and proceeded to conclude that because they were terminable on short notice, they did not plausibly foreclose competition. Unfortunately, due to protective order issues, the court redacted information on the term(s) of SanDisk’s exclusives, so we don’t know precisely how long would be too long.

The court also determined that PNY had failed to adequately plead a lack of alternative channels of distribution. Although PNY alleged that non-retail channels were insufficient, the court held that PNY’s allegations were wholly conclusory and therefore insufficient. The court gave PNY leave to amend.

The case is a (relatively) uncommon exclusive dealing victory at the motion to dismiss stage for defendants. It shows that courts will scrutinize and look at exclusive dealing contracts (even if not attached to the complaint). It also demonstrates that in the case of short-term exclusives, and where the plaintiff does not allege in substantial detail why other distribution channels are insufficient to compete, plaintiffs’ claims may be dismissed.

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