Distribution, Competition, and Antitrust / IP Law

Return of Robinson-Patman Act and Resale Price Maintenance Litigation?

A quick note on a few recent developments suggesting that RP and RPM litigation is not yet dead.

First, on February 2, 2015, a court refused to dismiss claims against Clorox arising from its refusal to sell a small regional grocery chain the same large packs of products as Clorox sells to big box retailers. Clorox didn’t refuse to sell the smaller retailer products – it simply didn’t sell it the same large packs, which have a lower per unit cost. The court held that the practice might violate Section 2(e) of the Robinson-Patman Act, which prohibits discrimination in the furnishing of services or facilities in connection with the processing, handling, sale or offering for sale of a commodity purchased for resale. See Woodman’s Food Market, Inc. v. The Clorox Co., No. 14-cv-734-slc (W.D. Wis. Feb. 2, 2015).

Second, a slew of recently-filed suits have accused contact lens manufacturers of conspiring to set minimum resale prices for contact lenses sold at certain outlets. The manufacturers have been sued both by putative indirect purchaser classes as well as by Costco. The lawsuits generally allege that the manufacturers started to implement so-called “unilateral pricing policies” because they were concerned about deep discounts being offered by Wal-Mart, Costco, and others.

These cases do remind us to be careful about the design and implementation of pricing policies.

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About Howard Ullman

Antitrust, competition, and IP law enthusiast.

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